Blockchain

Bank of Japan will test digital yen with three megabanks

Even though Japan is undecided if it would develop a central bank digital currency, the Bank of Japan (BoJ) is continuing to test out a digital version of the yen. This is the case despite the fact that the BoJ is testing out a digital version of the yen (CBDC).

Nikkei, a Japanese news agency, reported on November 23 that the Japanese central bank has begun working with three megabanks and regional banks to conduct a trial CBDC issuance. Nikkei's report was based on information obtained from the Nikkei news agency. The Nikkei news agency was the source for the aforementioned information.

As part of the pilot program, the digital yen, which will eventually take the place of the paper yen as Japan's national digital currency starting in the spring of 2023, will be tested. This will be the first time the digital yen will be used.

The Bank of Japan, together with other major private banks and other institutions, will work together as part of the experiment to identify and address any problems that may crop up with the method by which customers deposit and withdraw money from their bank accounts.

According to the story, the pilot will test how Japan's future CBDC performs when it is not connected to the internet, with a special focus on payments that do not need the internet.

The Bank of Japan's central bank plans to continue with its CBDC experiment for around two years, and it will make a decision by 2026 on whether or not to develop a digital currency. This information comes from the article.

The declaration comes at a time when an increasing number of countries all over the world are launching research and development activities on CBDC, with countries like China acting as models for the rest of the world to follow in their footsteps.

Despite the fact that the vast majority of governments throughout the world have been working tirelessly to implement a CBDC, some nations, such as Denmark, have made the decision to withdraw from the competition.

As the key reasons for discontinuing their CBDC or CBDC-related efforts, the central banks cited a number of issues as the primary reasons for their decision, including the likelihood of obstacles for the private sector, unknown value and benefits, and other problems.

To this day, there has not been a single central bank that has completely ruled out the possibility of the launch of a CBDC.

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